Phnom Penh

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Our Cambodian adventure continued in the capitol city of Phnom Penh.  Once there, our driver took us to the heart of the tourist district.  We ended up staying at the Longlin House II for $12 /per night.  There were $8 rooms available but for that price you had to share a common bathroom.  On street 172, we were right in the middle of the best bars, restaurants and shopping the city has to offer.  The night-life can get pretty crazy.  Sean and I stumbled home in the wee hours most evenings.

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Pictured above and below are trash piles in the street at Kandall Market after the booths close at night.  Don’t worry, trash collection occurs most nights and the market is cleaned again for a new day.  The shops are quite busy and accumulate piles of trash each day.

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Phnom Penh’s streets are pretty congested and they seem to have their own rules of the road.  Pictured below are 5 on a motorbike.

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For evening meals, we Often chose to eat at the Longlin House I restaurant.  Meals there were quite good and very reasonably priced.  Plus, the offered 50 cent beers during their happy hour.  Watching the evening rush-hour on their patio was comical.

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Pictured above is one of the many children selling stuff on the streets to make extra money.

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The road-side shave was very good.  Obviously, this older barber knew what he was doing.

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Some things in Phnom Penh were comical to us but are a way of life for the locals.  Pictured above is a lady selling gasoline in one-liter whisky bottles to service the many scooters along with cigarettes.  Gas and smokes….Brilliant combo!

 

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Pictured above is a lady who just showed up and started to give me a massage while I was eating.  She didn’t ask for money but obviously hoped that I would pay.  I was quite surprised but gave her a tip anyway.

I respect the work ethic of the Cambodian people.  They all worked hard to get whatever money they could through very creative means.  Although obviously poor they were not beggars nor did they steal from or rob people.  I felt quite safe walking the streets at any hour.  After visiting many places in neighboring Thailand, I wish that more help would be given to educate this country that has equally impressive tourist sites and resources.

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